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, a prankster. it looks like he had better days because he is not begging on the streets but he is asking people to lend a hand. he is pranking again but this time he has a third arm. when people come up to give him cash he rips through it. >> he is pranking the people who are nice enough to give him the money. >> thank you very much. >> that was not nice. >> think about how many times he had to remake that. >> oh, my god. he almost got hit. he did run into the street. >> if only he had his headless shirt thing on he could do that and chop his head down. >> that guy might have run straight into the car had that happened. >>> a love story written in chalk. >> you can't put a price on that. >> see how the love story ends next "right this minute." and still to come a film that explores a place you may think you know all about. >> i am really excited about this film. >> you will discover a whole new world. >> see the other side "right this minute." >>> and there is no need for mountains when you have staircases, railings and all kinds of other things. >> this snowboard >>> welcome back to the show.
because it is time for "your business" makeover. >>> hi, there, everyone. i'm jj ram beg and welcome to "your business" where we give you tips and advice to help your business grow. a few months ago we came across a small bridal design company in new york, and it was an interesting company with what i thought were fabulous designs, but something on the business side seemed to be missing, and we found out that the company was in trouble, and that is why we decided to step in and give the owners a "your business" makeover. when brothers steven and gregory started their bridal dress company fancy in 2008 they could not believe the initial reaction. at their first trade show while the peers snickered, others took notic notice. >> a woman walked right over and said i love the sleeves and collars and tell me your story. >> that is when i knew it would work. >> nowhere in the collection would you find the common place long strapless dresses that brides were wearing. their look was vintage inspired and comfortable and tea-length dresses. >> the mood of the brand was to have a nostalgic appro
's the only way that you can get an international agreement. -- can't do it by begging the kyoto protocol approach was to beg. beg all the other countries to pick some target and then reach that target without any -- and, of course, even though many countries agreed like canada, they soon abandon it -- when it's not convenient, they abandon it -- you have to -- the only way you can enforce it is with the price, and that -- so that could be done. and, you know, i was in china and the china -- chinese leaders understand this. they don't deny their climate problem. they are engineers and they're rationale, and they don't want to be addicted to fossil fuels the way the united states is and have to protect the supply line around the world, so they are, number one in solar panels, wind power and nuclear power, building thirty nuclear power plants. so i don't -- but, of course, they do have a major problem with so many people in poverty and they're -- and they need -- they know they need to get them out of poverty or they may -- their government may not survive. so the -- of course, they're doin
a grassroots campaign to politics, which is what progressives have been begging him to do now for a while. it seems to be working. all the hash tags and all the my 2 k has tags has gotten up to 13,000 tweets per hour. not every one of them is, hey great idea, mr. president. a lot of them are coming from people who are conservatives saying whatever it is that they're saying. the point is he's in touch with the people. he's not living in a cocoon like he did in the first term. >> cenk: when they ask how would you spend that $200,000 that you wouldn't get if we didn't get to the fiscal cliff, he's getting a bazillion responses. >>> we talk about climate change on the show, and i want to go to stunning numbers. in 2011 we had 38.2 billion tons of carbon dioxide released. this is the most stunning number now. we released 2.4 million pounds of carbon dioxide every second last year. every second of every day. that's amazing. now one other thing about this, the protocol that they signed back in 1997, the goal was reduce emissions by 5%. what happened since they signed that and we never ratified.
, begged for the ring but was ignored. >>> a twister tore through the sunshine state leaving about 40 homeowners with severe property damage. so far central florida officials have recorded down power lines and trees, as well as scattered debris along roadways. >>> finally, our four-alarm fire ruined preps for difl ya's annual new year's day celebration. the blaze torched a warehouse that was used to store costumes and floats for the mummers' parade. there were over 100 firefighters that battled that fire before it was brought under control. organizers for the mardi gras-like event says they won't need what to replace until they assess the damage. >>> well, to sports, "monday night football," texans and patriots. new england's tom brady connected on four touchdown passes. 42-15. the nba, houston and san antonio went to overtime. surged ahead for a 134-26 victory over the rockets. >>> in miami lebron james poured in 27 points against atlanta, and the heat beat the hawks, 101-92. >>> all right. it's being called one of the worst free throws ever caught on tape. here's why. look at this g
these. they start out kind of begging them and then they get really angry that would bring them down on you and the girl was down on you the confederacy really has a starvation level of food crisis and when that happens they know it's coming. governors and county clerks are writing each other and writing the secretary of war saying you can't take any more food out of the counties for the army. these people are starving. of the women stepped in at the moment to represent communities and they start really attacking the confederate government about the justice of the military policies. the rich man's war and the poor man's fight becomes as well the men are not home, the women step up and they start to rewrite power on the home front into their hands and the notes themselves as powerful constituencies of the state and county officials have to take account of and in the spring of 1863 there is a wave of riots the stores in atlanta and its more than a dozen sweeps the confederacy all by women from like a dozen in richmond to 300 followed by the crowd of a thousand other people, and this is
] i beg pardon sir but perhaps you prefer to come back tomorrow. evidently his honor is unavoidably detained. i'll wait. yes sir [music] [music] you happy darling. yea but i am scared too. of what? i don't know. i've never been scared of nothing in all my life. dr higgins says your. nah it ain't nothing the doctor knows about, something i can't figure out myself. except maybe cause i found something i never had before something i want to hold on to. a place like this a feeling of quiet inside a new slant on things. ah i don't know -i'm talking screwy. no you're not, it makes me so happy to hear you talk like that. happy? fred i am beginning to find you again. [music] ah honey i'm all mixed i can't. you see i made a deal, well how could i know that i meet up with a girl like you. i rather cut my arm off than hurt you. [music] i like to puzzle it out for just a couple of minutes myself. its alright darling. [music] [music] [dramatic music] that was a very touching scene. what are you gum-shoeing around for. i have some nice news for you, do you remember i promised that if you'd help m
themselves. >> if they were not here, they would be in the streets begging. if they are not properly looked after, these orphans will be exploited, a threat to the security in the future. bikes with bombs and assassinations still happening in iraq every day, -- >> with bombs and assassinations still hanging in iraq -- happening in iraq every day, the number increases. >> now to a holiday tradition many of us are quite familiar with. millions of people will record their celebrations on everything from cameras to smartphones, but over a century ago it was cutting edge to capture it. one of the first ever family recordings at christmas time has been discovered by curators at the national museum in london. >> this wax cylinder contains events that took place more than 100 years ago. when it was played by curators at the museum in london, this was what they heard. ♪ the recording who was in 1904 of a 7-year-old singing to his family. it is recreated by his great- grandson. the recordings are of the war family who live in north london. cromwell in the middle was ahead of the family. here with h
life doing press and begging, and they're called politician. and once in a while a publicker servant, we get one who also has the capacity to be a public servant and has a little time left over at the end of the day between lying and begging to take care of the country. [laughter] and as milton friedman said, we just don't have the time to bone up on the people who are trying to rob us through the x corporation, the people who are trying to rob us through the y union and the people who are getting a subsidy for this and that because we think about it for ten seconds a year, and they think about it all day every day. so there's only one thing that we can do, and that's to cut taxes and slash the size of the government. [applause] because, you know, who knows, who knows if there are confidence men. i don't know. you know, i met mitt romney. i like him very much. i shook his hand. on the other hand, i actually grew up and was born on the south side of chicago where obama claims to come from and was born in hyde park, and i saw that whole substratum -- i see everything through -- of cour
soldiers begged him not to go, he told them to support general burnside as they had supported him and off he went. a great moment that vindicated his patriotism in a difficult year. but the other thing to remember and i alluded to it in the speech was bad in april 1861, when the confederates fired on work sumpter, there was not a single man in the north who had ever led more than 1000 troops in battle. and the men who had led that anywhere in their 60's. the war was being commanded by, in the best case, captains in the regular army who had experience commanding one or 200 men and in the worst case, politicians who had never led a single person in battle. so the fact that lincoln had a hard time finding the generals who could lease -- lead these vast armies of 100,000 men are more shouldn't surprise us. .. and every day he heard from people urging him to do nothing about slavery, that the issue is not slavery. his southern border of the union was comprised of four slaveowning states, missouri, kentucky, maryland and delaware. he was in constant fear of any move that would cause them to sim
. you see more people begging-- and a different class of peoplei begging, people who had recently been sort of somewhere at the bottom of the middle class. >> brown: stallings is trained as a classicist, reading ancient greek and latin.phlu she did an acclaimed translation of the roman philosopher, lucretius' "the nature of things." and her own poetry has garnered several prizes. in 2011 she was the recipient of a macarthur fellowship, the so- called "genius award." her latest collection, titled "olives," explores, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i t
, an area the size of the u.s. and mexico combined. >> melting on the greenland ice sheet is a beg concern. bah that is moving water that is currently, thawing the ice moving it into the ocean. if that continues it will have an impact on people who live in coastal regions. >> jen jer zee, abc news, new york. >>> there is a lot of folks out there think, global warming or climate change as the it is better called is a hoax or need study. look at pieces like that. and the numbers. i don't know. it is not global warming or climate change someone explain to me what it is then. that's all. >> really truly only been tracking this since 1976 i think it is. >> numbers since then are pretty alarming. >> we are talking about what, 46 years, as opposed to thousand of years. >> but imagine itch the rate of the last, 46 years lasts 1,000 years what will our planet look look if it is exists. >> dooms day. doomsday. the world is ending on december 21. >> all right. we are getting a stunning new look right now at our planet while it exists from way up in space. nasa just released these pretty spectacular i
, too ♪ "don't forget me," i beg "i'll remember," you said ♪ sometimes, it lasts in love but sometimes, it hurts instead ♪ sometimes, it lasts in love but sometimes it hurts instead... >> cooper: "someone like you" has become another adele anthem, written about that same boyfriend who broke her heart. >> adele: ♪ never mind i'll find someone like you ♪ i wish nothin' but the best for you, too ♪ "don't forget me," i beg "i'll remember," you said ♪ sometimes, it lasts in love but sometimes, it hurts instead ♪ sometimes, it lasts in love but sometimes it hurts instead... >> cooper: the song is incredibly sad, and her fans cry right along to it, so much so it became a running gag on "saturday night live." >> and... play... ♪ ♪ ( laughter ) ( laughter ) >> adele: that's what i was doing when i was writing it. ( laughter ) >> cooper: she can laugh about it now. she says she no longer feels the same way about the song or the guy she once did. >> adele: "someone like you" was about him getting engaged really quickly after we broke up. and... and i wrote that to feel better abo
of time. smith has been asked to chair the science committee. i charge you and beg you to get him to watch your movie. i age that appointment would disturb you. >> in fact, we have distributed copies of this film to every member of the senate and the house. of course we have no idea if it's been watched by any of the members of congress but i really hope that they will. the thing that really killed me, and just overwhelms me sometimes is the knowledge that we here in america, in our current time and place, we have all the knowledge. we are the leaders internationally in observing these place from the ground, and observing how climate change is changing the world from ocean bowies to research slips to lied on the ground, it's just that they've been trying to ignore the tangible information and evidence that the best minds of our time are accumulateing and amassing. it grieves me to think that somebody in such an influential leadership position has been so eagerly and aggressively denying what has been a clear and obvious charge to our society and the rest of the world. >> jennifer: i cannot
. >> we had people come to the aror and beg me not to quit. ew deporter: but it's hard recruiting new doctors for the lart of america's heart land. o kansas, 97 of its 105 counties are considered underserved. five counties have no doctor at all. >> it's scary because we don't ysve as many physicians as we need. o reporter: so the university of kansas opened up a branch of its medical school in salina, iat it calls the smallest itdical school in america. it's now on its second class of eight students. >> i cannot wait to bond with the people and feel a sense of belonging. >> reporter: students like julianne rathburn bring one more n ing-- a desire to work in rural america. workou know everybody. everybody knows you. and there's a sense of loyalty and respect. hereeporter: but there is one drawb drawback-- a rural family doctor in america makes on average about $70,000 a year, a specialist, say a cardiologist in a big city like los angeles, earns on average more than in00,000 a year. vn durham, population just over 100, the local doctor recently closed up shop. folks feared her dream of
to a weaker dollar, probably higher gold prices, and more interday volatility. >> susie: so that begs the question then, what should investors be doing with their money. they know rates are really going to be super low for a while. we know the wall street saying, "don't fight the fed." so where should people put their money right now? >> the most likely scenario is that you get a bit of tranquility and then something breaks. and it breaks in the sense that systems are not built to be run at artificial interest rates. and with the fed being both a player and a referee in markets. so the most likely outcome is the benefit of tranquility and then a higher risk of something breaking. so what we're doing is taking down risks. it is a wonderful time for risksset it is time to reduce your risk exposure, and it is time to build a little more inflation protection in your portfolios. >> susie: mohammed, are you buying treasures at this time? would you suggest investors get back to treasuries? >> i would say focus on inflation protected treasuries or tips. part of this message from ben bernanke
. and i would say that do you know what my wife has gone through? she would just practically begged me to call her girl.. and i will make myself sound good. even >>catherine: that part is not true that i was in a bed of fair [laughter] >> but as the chest.and as i was just mentioning, and jest.... it is not easy. and at the kron 4 audience, they have needs. the thursday night football. this one night of the week that i think that it is too much. perhaps sunday, monday, but after a thursday. here is after a fumble. 34-13. cincinnati 8-6. and talking about too much football. roger fide- goddell.. the nfl commissioner isthe nfl is considering expanding the number of teams that make the currently 12 teams make the playoffs, but a 14, and even a 16 team playoff is being discussed. commissioner roger goodell confirmed that the committee will be looking at it in the next few months. why? money of course >> and even president of, even providing some insight on the nfl lockout. >> we are going to come back. , the warriors have been great. none the less, you can feel it. >> what about the sharks
. you kw, they not onlywn the twilight saga and hunger games which are begging obviously for sequels but big tv production studio as well, have mad men, weed, anger management, a lot of food renewal seasons ahead for those and lots of sequels on the movies, the stock is only 11 times earnings, we think there is more to go, although the name has done well. >> aqua financial a new pick here, ocn. >> this stock shot more than double this year, 34 and change, how much higher in the next twelve months, do you think? >> well, i think it can go higher, it had a little pullback today and i think it i attractive on pullback, they are the low cost producer of servicing mortgage debt, particularly the low quality sub prime mortgage debt, new york banks want out of that, they have gotten the book from j.p. morgan, morgan stanley, goldman sachs, they are the low cost producer provider, only sell nine or ten times forward earnings, the valuation is expensive and i think the stock has room to go and maybe another two or three years to it. >> you have positions in both of those shares, sandy? >> the
from the talks. looks like we are going over the cliff. >> that begs the question if there is reid mcconnell deal in the senate. some discussion it would probably include an extension of tax rates for most americans. extension of unemployment benefits. possibly a measure to prevent the scheduled cut in medicare payments to doctors. how will the house respond to any senate deal? >> i think if mcconnell is onboard he will bring a lot of republican votes. the democrats are by and large if the president supports it they will back their president. there could be enough votes in the house, speaker john boehner talked about amending that bill. i think if it gets a 70 to 30 senate vote i think i it get te votes in it the house to pass but it might not happen until after january 3, january 4. >> i want to ask you about what ed henry was just reporting. president obama says either a deal is reached or you vote on the short-term stop gap measure. if republicans fail to pass it i'm summarizing it's their fault. so the president kind of tossing the ball into the republican's camp, placing blame
of four americans serving their country, begged for resources. outrageous. this is so obvious, they have been exposed and we can't get the answers from the one person who can tell us what transpired. record of that everything happened that day. when she knew. >> eric: she has a concussion. headache. this is ridiculous. the state department, changing facts, changing talking point points. the "new york times" are out at the state department. >> bob: you never take their headline for anything but. this they said they would be ousted from the jobs they held. they were. that didn't say they'd be fired from the state department. >> kimberly: that is a joke. book why? >> kimberly: you think it's sufficient? >> eric: eric boswell, assistant secretary of state. for security resigned. >> kimberly: they were rewarded with another good job? that's bad case. >> bob: the other people are keer foreign service officers. >> eric: is this more of the same b.v. the obama administration? this is the obama administration. presidential appointees. >> greg: i don't think anyone is misled. blame this on fog of
to say good morning to you and happy new year's eve to you this morning. >> reporter: we are talk beg secretary of state hillary clinton who is hospitalalized after doctors find a blood clot. we are going to ask about the possible health implications she might suffer. >>> also we are following the last minute negotiations to avoid the fiscal cliff in washington. plus we are going to take a look back at the biggest stories of 2012. >>> we went out and did what we said we were going to do. we within seven straight, won our division and now it is up to us to decide how far we want to go. >> wow, some people were writing them off earlier in the season. robert griffin ii and alfred morris combined as the skins beat the cowboys and they win the nfc east. >>> our 9news delia gonzalez had a massive smile all morning long. live with reaction from the fans, i love the play by play you had with paul lester this morning. >> reporter: i think he is on his second cup of coffee. third cup. look at that. it is going to be a long morning, i'm in for it, he is going to be really hyper. i only stayed up
was extradited to the united states today after beg arrested in january in native peru. police say surveillance video and photos caught him in stores at the times of the attacks. the women were cut while shopping in spots like fairoaks mall and fairfax town center last year. they were not seriously hurt. >>> chill in the air tonight. according to doug we ain't seen nothing yet. is that right? >> exactly right, jim. i think this time friday night we'll be feeling the cold. a lot cooler out there now than it was earlier today. look at high temperature ttz. 62 in washington. 64, fredericksburg. 54, martins burke. cool air has come in. the wind are still thup up ther. temperatures, wind chills are down by 20, 30 degrees. current wind chill. 32. 30 in frederick. 34 in winchester. 36 in culpeper. yeah, lot more thought of coming. we will talk about it coming up. >> general david petraeus' former mistress will not face cyberstalking charges. the justice department says it is dropping its investigation into whether paula broadwell stalked a woman she perceived to be romantic rival. an fbi investigation
some snow. >> okay. that's not bad. not begging. >> i'm sorry. we do have a little bit of rain on the way though that could damp be santa's plans. i'm sure he'll still make his travels, no problem. let's take a look outside with the michael & son live weather cam. we're taking a look at the capitol building. yesterday at this time it was so windy. right now it is colder, but it's less windy. that is for sure. 35 degrees right now with clear skies. that dew point 19. it's really cold and dry atmosphere with winds out of the west at 8 miles per hour right now. that's a big improvement. we're going to continue to see those winds relaxing as we head through the overnight hours. so in your weather headlines, we have very cold air in place tonight, but less windy. that's going to lead to a very nicesunday. we're going to see lots of sunshine to help bump up the temperatures. weak disturbances on the way that could bring rain for santa. right now already down to 30 degrees in gaithersburg. 32 martinsburg and leesburg. same in manassas. with the wind chill, it's making it feel like 24
she comes back. there is no mass-produced hun. every human beg is unique. and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep nuer sto. the only place in the world you'll find the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusiveollection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust to your size and shape. temperature-balancing bedding. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you to aust to the support your bodyeeds. each of your bodies. in the name of human individuality: the sleep number collection. discover how our sleep professionals can individualize your sleep experience. clusively at one of our 400 sleep number stores nationwide. sleep number. comfort individualized. is holiday season, give the gift that's magical: the innovative airfit adjustable pillow at special 30% savings. cheryl: nicole petallides give us one of the best of the performers and now for one of the worst we go back to nicole petallides. >> we are looking at a name under
provide the people who live here would like us to leave. they want to return some normalcy and that begs that question, when we do go, when we leave this town and when our world continues, we leave all of these people with a brand-new normal and something they're going to have to figure out for themselves what their new normal is going to be like. and i just want to share an anecdote. moments ago a man by the name of joe whalen came here to meet me by the creek and seen the piece run today on cnn. he lives in town not far away. he's a general contract, builds homes in the community. he was so moved by that notion that once we all leave, they will be left alone with their new normal. he didn't know what to do. he said i want to do something. i don't know what to do. and ultimately he came up with a plan and he shared it with me moments ago. he's going to go around town to all of those affected by the tragedy and with some of his colleagues in the building business, he's going repair their homes. whatever he sees needs doing he's going to do it and he's not going to ask for anything in ret
the security demands were being begged for? >> well, i think it is going to be three areas that she is going to face questions on the benghazi issue. the first is going to be, was she aware of the deteriorating environment and did she know there were cans for more security that were then denied? so did she know what the accountability review board releases last week in their findings blamed on midlevel officials, did it get up to her? that is the first question. the second thing people will want to know why didn't she testify? why didn't she go on the sunday shows like susan rice. >> she was tired. >> i mean, i think they're going to ask her about that. did she agree with the talking points? did she agree with what the is ambassador to the united nations said? i think finally, i think they're definitely going to ask hillary clinton about not just what the environment was like in the run-up to benghazi, but i think they're going to ask her, was she trying to normalize the u.s. posture in libya overall so there wasn't as much military? and why did she want to do that knowing that the situation
're giving them exactly what they want. >> eliot: if they live that long. beg argument for believing as he does, which is not a whole lot. let's switch gears, the republicans and their their men for their committees, have they learned nothing of the 19 white old men. this could be a campaign poster for the democratic party. why didn't they have the wisdom to change that. >> because learning is appeasement. this is whiting than an albino troop. it's ludicrous and it goes to show they don't learn. they don't want to learn. they don't value that. >> eliot: you know, i got to disagree with you a little bit. there is movement on immigration. >> yeah a little bit. >> eliot: they're throwing something-- >> in terms of getting votes. >> eliot: correct, but not giving up power. >> no, it's progress for republicans is what matters. they'll man der to our pander to our mexican-american friends just enough to get their votes. >> eliot: maybe you're on to something when they had the convention when they rolled out minority or gender-based individual that they can puts up on the lecturn and say see. >>
and thirst, and i send down a famine, when they pray for the sun, and i drown them with rain, and they beg me for reasons, my only reply is: i never apologize, never explain. when the angel of death is a black wind around them and children are dying in terrible pain, then they burn little candles in churches, but still i never apologize, never exain. when the christians kill jews, and jews kill the muslims, and muslims kill writers they think are profane, they clamor for peace or for reasons at least, but i never apologize, never explain. when they wail about murder and torture and rape, and unlucky abel complains about cain, and they ask me just why i had planned it like this, i never apologize, never explain. of course, if they're smart they can figure it out -- the best of all reasons is perfectly plain. it's because i just happen to like it this way -- so i never apologize, never explain." >> job kept asking why -- >> poor thing, yeah. >> and never got an answer. >> no. >> jesus himself, "oh, god, why hast thou forsaken me?" no answer. >> i'm not so impervious to the world that i don't kn
of tactics to raid assets. >> reporter: they can be as obvious as forging signatures on checks, begging for loans that never paid back or accusing power of attorney. >> when you give power of attorney to somebody it can give them unfettered access to your accounts. somebody who misuses those can do real damage. that's a problem for elderly. >> reporter: to help prevent elder abuse have bank and investment statements sent to a person you truce -- you trust to monitor accounts average for direct deposit and automatic bill pay, consult a reputable attorney for advice on wills and limiting power of attorney. fortunately, for arthur a legal services program for the elderly he consulted obtained a court order voiding the granddaughter's deed, returning the property to him. consumer reports says, if you are or elderly relative is concerned about financial abuse a good place if get help is national center on elderly abuse. i posted a link at i'm michael finney, on your side. >>> -- >> par [ unintelligible ] >>> good morning. 6:18. big weather story will be tomorrow morning when mo
beg with the court not to incarcerate them. what happens? you spend time in jail and you pay the fine. but you are fault a corporate client. you are an individual. >>shepard: the money they made for profit was $2.5 billion in the last quarter. the fine is $600 million less than that. the people who are sitting on this side of the aisle on this side of the border there, and are seeing what this corruption has done and what it has done to the nation over time we are supposed to say well, they made them pay $1.9 billion and no one is going to jail? i cannot imagine too many are happy about this. >>guest: i don't think so. the in edge for corporate america is commit your crime and as one put it, better to seek forgiveness than ask permission. that is what they are doing, seeking forgiveness after the fact. again, if this was an individual, they would be sitting in front of a federal district court judge probably incarcerated awaiting sentencing. >>shepard: but, instead, their stock is up today. thank you. >> police say there is no question, a murder on a crowded street in the middle of th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 210 (some duplicates have been removed)